Tuesday, April 05, 2016

Review in Poetry Ireland's Trumpet

My review of recent books by three Irish poets — Trevor Joyce, Christodoulos Makris, and Peter O’Neill — appears in the new issue (5) of Trumpet, Poetry Ireland’s critical review.  The publication is available in hard copy up until a new issue comes out, at which time it becomes downloadable as a PDF.

Poetry Ireland describes the magazine like this: “Reviews, opinions and essays on poetry and the arts in a bite sized literary pamphlet.”

Here are some snippets from my essay.  The whole piece runs to 1735 words, so these are just teasers:

Trevor Joyce’s booklet Rome’s Wreck is a translation of Edmund Spenser’s sonnet sequence Ruines of Rome (1591), which itself is a translation of Joachim du Bellay’s Les Antiquités de Rome (1558). . . .

Where Joyce’s primary formal restriction is his use of iambic tetrameter, Christodoulos Makris, in his second collection, The Architecture of Chance, employs all manner of controlling devices. . . .

In contrast to the ironic humour that Makris deploys, Peter O’Neill in his third collection, The Dark Pool, is nothing if not serious. . . .
 

3 comments:

FG said...

Hello Mike - re. Joyce's 'Rome's Wreck' - it's monosyllables, that's the constraint, the whole poem is written in monosyllables. F.Gaynor

Mike Begnal said...

F.G. -- Thanks for the clarification. This means I would have to rethink my initial assertion about Joyce's 'adherence to the iambic measure' (as perhaps, instead, he intends his lines merely as eight monosyllables, without concern for the metrical pattern of those syllables). I would also, then, revise my comment about the 'rhythm [in rare moments] feeling forced, as in line 10 from sonnet XII' (since, again, it seems a regular metre was not Joyce's goal). The one-time occurrence of the six-syllable line (l. 11 in XXXII) is still noteworthy, though, since every other line contains eight.

FG said...

Yep, you can take for granted with Joyce's work that there's nothing done without consideration - even if it's the admission of a little chaos. There's an excellent (if demanding in its use of modern philosophy) piece by David Lloyd on 'Rome's Wreck' in the Shearsman collection of essays on Joyce (edited by Niamh O'Mahony).